Tawhirimatea in Māori mythology is the God of Wind. As Tawhirimate circulates and gathers momentum he also gathers those who are looking for change, those looking to better their lives. They embark on their journey with Tawhirimatea who carries them to their destination, therefore in this instance to Aotearoa. Te Taenga mai o nga hau e wha.

Why do we have a Māori model of practice and what does it mean?

For Māori it is an unconditional process that is intrenched in our very being. We are one with the taiao and the taiao is one with us. If there is a disconnect then it’s about the individual not the process. Why a Māori model of practice? To keep the connection to oneself, to one another to everything around us te taioa.

Mai nga hau e wha in this context means ‘of the four winds. Te taenga mai o nga hau e wha is our model of practice referring to those who have left their birth land and have travelled the oceans arriving in Aotearoa New Zealand, making it their home. The three symbols that sit in the centre of this model represents the challenges, the trials and tribulations, of their journey.

Click on the pulsing circles below to read about each aspect of our model of practice.

Diagram of the Te Taenga Mai Model of Pratice

Te Urunga mai o Tamanui te ra. Te Whakawhitinga o te Moananui a kiwa.

Symbol one depicts the rising of the sun as its rays glisten over the seas of Kiwa. Kiwa (an ancestor of the He Rangatira) who himself has been said to travel the seas of Kiwa. This symbolises the journey of refugee, migrants and asylum seekers who have taken the same journey as Kiwa.

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Ko te manaakitanga o te Rangatira.

The korowai, or the cloak, symbolises manaakitanga, the epitome of human existence. Manaakitanga embraces all things with respect and integrity. Giving and receiving of manaakitanga ensures harmonical balance. We are all Rangatira in our own right and of our own life’s journey. It embodies concepts of hospitality, kindness, generosity, care and support.

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Te tini me te mano o nga whetu.

Symbol three makes reference to the multitude of stars that glistens in the night sky of Matariki. From the North, South, East and West, from the four corners of the world to arrive here in Aotearoa making it their home.

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Poutama

The Poutama known as the ‘Stairway to heaven’ used in this Māori model of practice refers to the levels of which we live life. Each step is the level of each stage of our journey. What happens on those levels, determine where we end up in life and the choices that we make.

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Poutama

The Poutama known as the ‘Stairway to heaven’ used in this Māori model of practice refers to the levels of which we live life. Each step is the level of each stage of our journey. What happens on those levels, determine where we end up in life and the choices that we make.

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Kaokao

The Kaokao depicted in this Māori model of practice sits on either side of the korowai. This symbolises strength, and power. This is what is needed when one embarks on a life changing journey.

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The model of practice Te taenga mai o nga hau e wha is founded on the values of Tumanako, Aroha and Whakapono.

Tumanako – One’s hopes and aspirations

Tumanako are one’s hopes, aspirations, wants, desires. This is the drive that many including refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants choose to come to Aotearoa in search of a better life trusting in the choice they have made.

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The model of practice Te taenga mai o nga hau e wha is founded on the values of Tumanako, Aroha and Whakapono.

Aroha – Love

Unconditional sharing and giving without a second thought is the extension of Aroha. Sharing the breath of life, to give unconditionally to each other and ‘te taiao’ (our surroundings). Giving and showing respect for the people of this land Tangata whenua their values and traditions / practices.

Love is the catalyst for true and honest collaboration, change, development, and achievement. This can demonstrate care and compassion to each other and the world around us.

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The model of practice Te taenga mai o nga hau e wha is founded on the values of Tumanako, Aroha and Whakapono.

Whakapono – To believe, to trust

Belief gives us direction and focus. Believe in yourself, your ability to accomplish and achieve. Believe in your values and life’s purpose. This is not just about an individual it is also about the collective and about the process.

Trust in yourself, trust the process, trust that you are understood, and you understand others. Trust and believe in your insights, your strengths and weaknesses.

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Whare

A whare (house), signifying shelter, safety and welcome. For Māori, Whare can also signify each person in the whare and wellbeing of that person. Whare within this model of practice is signifying a large community of migrants, refugees & asylum seekers in Aotearoa.

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Koru

The three koru signify different generations, children, parents and grandparents, representing family, and ancestors from the past, the present and the future.

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View a larger image of the model of practice.